LDAP directory in the cloud

Json2Ldap iconJson2Ldap hit the cloud this month.

I’ve always wanted to put up an online demo for the JSON web service for LDAP directory access and this is reality now. If you visit the NimbusDS website you’ll see a new Json2Ldap demo page where you can play with three Ajax directory applications:

  • Online employee directory: Presents a list of company employees where by clicking on a person’s name additional details are displayed.
  • Resolving group membership: An important organisational feature of directories is the ability to specify groups for things like departments, permissions and mailing lists. This app lists the available groups and resolves the associated members.
  • User authentication: Ajax form to authenticate a user’s UID and password against their LDAP directory account.

The Ajax apps were written in JavaScript and use a relatively small subset of Json2Ldap’s web API, namely the JSON requests ldap.connect, ldap.search, ldap.getEntry, ldap.simpleBind and ldap.close.

Ajax employee directory

As for the directory web service, I set up a Json2Ldap instance at CloudBees, together with an embedded in-memory LDAP directory that represents a typical corporate DIT consisting of a user base and several groups. You can view a screenshot of the directory tree to get an idea of its user and group structure. In a deployed state Json2Ldap with the in-memory directory take up 40 MB of memory which fit nicely into the free PaaS plan of CloudBees (256 MB).

The directory behind Json2Ldap can of course be any other LDAP v3 compatible server, such as Microsoft Active Directory, Novell eDirectory, OpenLDAP, OpenDJ, etc. So there’s complete flexibility here, also in terms of schema, as Json2Ldap is schema-agnostic.

How about Ajax responsiveness?

Measurements with the JSON-RPC Shell show that JSON calls to the Json2Ldap service at CloudBees are typically completed in about 150 ms. I don’t have a basis for comparison with other cloud vendors here, but I suppose responsiveness impacted by the relative datacentre location (e.g. EU vs USA) and the efficiency of the PaaS abstraction layers of CloudBees. Their PaaS is actually running on top of Amazon’s cloud infrastructure, so there may be quite many layers involved. When I compare the response time to a Json2Ldap service on the local intranet, the JSON calls here take about 15 ms to complete, which is an order of magnitude quicker. For the actual demo apps the 150 ms response time however is okay and doesn’t affect responsiveness in a noticeable way. You can of course try it out for yourself.

The next planned cloud demos will cover the other NimbusDS software products – JsonSSO and AuthService.

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  • sue

    Hi Vladimir –

    The demos are great! Are there code samples on the site? I see a very basic one in the Web API section, but I’m stuck in the mud on trying to work with the Json2Ldap API to do more than just connect to LDAP. (I’m a newbie to JSON, Jquery, etc.). Any help appreciated.

    Thanks!
    Sue

  • Hi Sue,

    How do you wish to work with the Json2Ldap API, from a JavaScript app or from some other language?

    You may have a look at the JavaScript for the online demo, it is at http://nimbusds.com/scripts/json2ldap-demo.js

    I will also try to think of a simple tutorial or something.

  • Wilbert Zapata

    Hi,

    Is there any way to sync Gmail contacts with your LDAP services?

    Thanks

  • It should be possible with a sync script to run against the GMail web API. Please, get in touch with us if you wish to discuss this: http://nimbusds.com/contact.html